Saturday, August 29, 2015

From our Instagram!

What does it mean to be a entrepreneur? Link in my bio. (Photo: Pixabay - ejaugsburg)

via@jycmba Instagram

Creative Entrepreneurs – Follow Your Passion vs Show Me the Money

Following our passion or chasing the money seems to be the classic dilemma of life - especially for creative entrepreneurs.

Sure, we all know those who are not only passionate about their work but also incredibly successful. So even though this four minute mile has long been broken, we seem to believe that it’s reserved for the few and fortunate to achieve “the dream.”

Yet, when we look at 1000 True Fans by Kevin Kelly, he basically breaks down how success is very attainable to those of us without a Lady Gaga following.

My friend August gives some good advice on how to pay attention to your passions. She recommends taking time to meditate and to write down ideas.

I’m a big fan of both of these ideas. For a long time I resisted meditation - believing this to be too “passive” or just plain waste of time. In reality it is essential to creativity.

There’s been studies that one of the key reasons why we sleep is to “empty the cup.” Our brains literally need to dump their buffers filled with stuff that accumulates throughout day. According to this video and referenced study, it’s one or the other.. operating or flushing wastes..

On the other hand Mike Rowe shares why he says we shouldn’t follow our passions - he shares how his passion was to be a tradesman, but was told by his grandfather that life would be a lot more satisfying and productive if I got myself a different kind of toolbox.

That was a tough and bitter pill to swallow, but Rowe says, “I remember a very successful septic tank cleaner who told me his secret of success. ‘I looked around to see where everyone else was headed, and then I went the opposite way,’ he said. ‘Then I got good at my work. Then I found a way to love it. Then I got rich.’”

So, how can we “turn pro” as creative entrepreneurs?

While you’re building your bridge to creative life, invest in side projects. These will often be the building blocks to your future success. Felicia Day found that different skills like craft paid off when she needed to everything from graphics for her videos to promotional flyers.

Steve Jobs discovered that his passion for calligraphy helped Apple to find its niche with desktop publishers and graphic designers.

Surround yourself with creative entrepreneurs - especially those who are just a little ahead of you on the path you want to go down.

Whether it’s the new wave of film makers like George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola, or the Paris writers during the 1920s like Hemingway, you will find not only inspiration and encouragement but connections for funding or work.

Our school systems still teach the pass / fail mentality of the Industrial Age. Instead, choose to think in terms of only success and lessons. We’ve definitely talked about how fear is the death of creativity.

As Thomas A. Edison said, "I have not failed. I've just found 10000 ways that won't work."

Your creative business is a lot like tango. When I teach a class, I point out how students often get in their own way by being afraid to try a step. Being relaxed and open to possibilities allows your creativity to flow.

So where do you stand on this debate? How you feel about this decision?

The post Creative Entrepreneurs – Follow Your Passion vs Show Me the Money appeared first on Butterfly Formula.

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Friday, August 21, 2015

From our Instagram!

Local farmers markets are a great way to kick off Friday. Where do you find inspirations? I share some tips for exploration in my blog. Link in my bio.

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Thursday, August 20, 2015

What Does Gratitude Offer Creativity?

"Onegaishimasu." [for what we're about to receive] This Japanese expression always makes me think about AC/DC - "For Those About To Rock (We Salute You"." It's the way to invite your partner to practice with you in aikido.

We bowed respectfully to each other and began practicing the technique that Michael Gelb has just demonstrated.. although I was familiar with this waza (skill,) somehow I never saw it the same again.

Gelb had explained how the core movement was a helix & tied it to DNA - I'd learned later on that he's a management consultant specializing in helping executives think creatively..

At the time I was still working on my MBA, and ironically we ended up using his book How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci as a text book in our entrepreneur class.

Some folks may think of the whole Law of Attraction thing as a bit too "woo woo".. but if we take it on the general dynamics of this, it's the difference between being attractive vs repulsive..

Just ask any boy who grew up here in the states about the story of Tom Sawyer and he'll know how Tom enticed the neighborhood kids into painting the fence for him. Instead of chasing after others to help (being repulsive) he made them curious and ultimately the task irresistible to the others.

Seems a bit fanciful? Well, for years Cellspace weekly dances has been run on volunteer efforts.. while other tango events involved paid help, individuals came together and volunteered their time to teach classes, DJ, even set up and clean.

But what about our personal lives? How does being grateful invite in MORE - more fun, more joy, more creativity?

I've shared before how Julia Cameron's Artists Way is a chance to explore and to be curious. Hidden within the DNA of her method is gratitude..

  • Taking walks - appreciation and gratitude for nature
  • Morning pages - 3 daily meditations on what we're grateful
  • Artist's dates - enjoying what we have and again being grateful

Today I make it a daily routine to meditate. I've resisted this for a L-O-N-G time.. but finally I realized I needed to "empty the cup" - both mentally and spiritually. Only then do we have room to invite more of what we want - not only be affirming and visualizing, but with a sense of GRATITUDE.

Without gratitude we focus on the negative. We invite into our lives more of what we DON'T want that way.

Henry Ford said

whether you think you can or think you can't, you're right" Thoughts are energy.

Whatever we put our energy into we get more of.. That's just a basic law of the universe - energy is neither created nor destroyed. So, when we talk about what we put our energy into, this is what we mean.

For the longest time I've known this but didn't fully appreciate the meaning. Reading this core message of Napolean Hill's classic Think & Grow Rich (get your free copy), I didn't fully appreciate the depth of its meaning.

A wise friend reminded me how "you know, John, the problem is that it's too simple. People naturally want to complicate it." He passed away a few years ago, but this friend died a rich man in my book surrounded by a thriving family and those who will always remember his generous spirit of service.

The one thing that struck me about this creative entrepreneur was how grateful he was. From the first time that I bought him a cup of coffee at Starbucks (our default meeting place) to the birthday wishes, this friend always expressed a sincere gratitude for even the smallest gesture.

When Dave started out as an entrepreneur, he would camp along the beach with his son out of the delivery van used to deliver books to stores. Although his business was just starting out, Dave was always grateful for time spent with his family, and he said that was why he went into business.

Years later, even having grown from boot strapping into operating from a warehouse and serving clients around the world, Dave said that he still appreciated those humble beginnings.

So, I suppose that's my takeaway. We may aspire to be like the rockstars of the world or indie moguls of our industry, but to live the simple life of a humble man that valued a truly rich life with freedom and passion - that's my goal as a creative entrepreneur.

Here's to you, Dave. I'm grateful for the moments we were able to share together.

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Thursday, August 13, 2015

From our Instagram!

Love it, @thechefchrishill ! Inspired me to bring this back from the morgue files.. fun music video shoot with @ theblackeys ! La vida #loco ! #throwbackthursday

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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Curiosity Breeds Creativity

I was always a curious kid and asked all kinds of questions.. Things like.. Why can’t I get up on stage and start singing, too? Who’s that lady holding my hand? Where did my mom go now? When will I finally get to drive a real car? How come that farmer got mad at me for doing a dance on his hat?

Well, in time we learned that some questions are more “acceptable” than others. Slowly but surely society teaches us to color between the lines. Unfortunately, this not only shapes our curiosity but also limits our creativity and imagination.

We often talk about thinking outside the box, and I’ve discussed creativity inside the box. But what happens when we keep shrinking the box?

How Curiosity Inspires Creative Works

Producer Brian Grazer is known for a diverse body of work. His films have covered almost every genre, and he credits his creative success to curiosity. In fact, Grazer turned his curiosity into a series conversations with anyone that he was interested in learning more about. Not only did these inspire ideas and give insights, it allowed Grazer to grow his own curiosity muscle and gain insight into how creativity and curiosity are really twin siblings.

"Curiosity is the tool that sparks creativity.. questions create a mind-set of innovation & creativity,” says Grazer. “..curiosity allows possibility that the way we're doing it now isn’t the only way, or even the best way."

Indeed we get in our own way of seeing possibilities if we’re not willing to be curious and simply ask questions. It’s when we assume that we have all the answers or that there’s nothing to learn that we’re really hearing the death knell of creativity.

How Curiosity Turned Barren Land into the Happiest Place on Earth

Walt Disney was known for his insatiable curiosity. He often went incognito and toured the grounds. No matter what aspect of the business Disney wanted to learn more about it. This was “management by wondering around” long before this became popular with the business guru’s.

Imagineer Bob Gurr who designed many of the attractions said, "Walt had a unique way of drawing out your creativity and poking holes in your assumptions. He wouldn’t push you - he would pull you.. lead you through new ideas. He would get u to ask, "What if?"

When Disney was designing the EPCOT center, he surrounded himself with books on urban planning - even experts in many fields.. So many innovations came from his willingness to explore & experiment - Disney was one of the first to embrace sound in his films, then color - even combining live action w/ animation. His commitment to quality was amplified by his constant curiosity. Disney had no problem asking even a janitor or 19 yr old operating jungle cruise about how to plus the Disney experience - how to deliver always more than expected.

How Curiosity Finds New Opportunities

You must shed the habits of farmers - complacent, repetitive, protective - and adopt the instincts of hunters - insatiable, curious, willing to destroy, says Jeremy Gutsche in Better and Faster. Ironically, one hunter that Gutsche highlights is actually a farmer.

Ron Finley grew up in south central LA and became a player in urban fashion through his curiosity. In high school he argued his way into home economics by pointing out how most chefs were male. Eventually, he turned this willingness to question the status quo when he noticed that he lived in a “food desert.”

Finley decided to do something about it. He asked what if these 26 square miles of vacant lots were turned into urban gardens. Soon others joined him, but it wasn’t long before complaints came in. This didn’t deter Finley and his group, LA Green Grounds. Getting signatures for their petition, they eventually got the support of the city.

“Why wouldn’t they be happy,” joked Finley. “Growing your own food is like printing money.”

He goes on to say, “..just like graffiti artists, where they beautify walls - me, I beautify lawns, parkways.”

I’ve shared how curiosity is the most important skill in business. So how do we actually nurture curiosity so that it grows into creative energy?

First, be open to exploring. Instead of worrying whether something is going to be a waste of time, consider that there are only discoveries and lessons - rather than “successes” or “failures.” There is nothing more destructive to creativity or curiosity than fear. But like our muscles tackling big stretches can pull something if we push too much before we’re ready.

Create the space. Your environment to be curious requires time and opportunity. Set aside the time to wander. We feel deprived - bombarded by demands. Unless we see ourselves as worth it, no one else will.

Connect with like minds. Another key part of environment is finding your tribe - those people who not only inspire and support you but lift you up. Throughout history “movements” have started with groups of artists and entrepreneurs being “curious” together - the Impressionists, the Classic period of music, the writers of the 1920s.

So how has your curiosity nurtured your creativity? or for that matter how are you nurturing your curiosity?

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